Everything Put Together

May 3, 2017 - Comment

An idyllic suburban life has never been portrayed to more queasy effect than in Marc Forsters “Everything Put Together”. Angie (Radha Mitchell, “High Art”) seems to have it all–a loving husband, a close circle of friends, a baby on the way. But when her newborn dies of SIDS, the isolated grief that quickly intervenes presents

An idyllic suburban life has never been portrayed to more queasy effect than in Marc Forsters “Everything Put Together”. Angie (Radha Mitchell, “High Art”) seems to have it all–a loving husband, a close circle of friends, a baby on the way. But when her newborn dies of SIDS, the isolated grief that quickly intervenes presents an alarming portrait of modern-day tribal outcasting as the American dream gets turned inside-out to reveal a cruel undertow. Treated as though she might taint their own families with bad luck, Angies girlfriends abandon Angie to her grief and increasingly unstable behavior. Forster (“Monsters Ball”) shuttles artfully between the intimate handheld camera commotion of communal activities–neighborly barbecues, shopping excursions, rap sessions among friends–and the motionless scenes of Angies unhinged state when alone, to create an atmosphere of suburban suffocation matched only by Todd Hayness “Safe”. “Everything Put Together” was shot entirely on digital video,An idyllic suburban life has never been portrayed to more queasy effect than in Marc Forster’s Everything Put Together. Angie (Radha Mitchell, High Art) seems to have it all–a loving husband, a close circle of friends, a baby on the way. But when her newborn dies of SIDS, the isolated grief that quickly intervenes presents an alarming portrait of modern-day tribal outcasting as the American dream gets turned inside-out to reveal a cruel undertow. Treated as though she might taint their own families with bad luck, Angie’s girlfriends abandon Angie to her grief and increasingly unstable behavior. Forster (Monster’s Ball) shuttles artfully between the intimate handheld camera commotion of communal activities–neighborly barbecues, shopping excursions, rap sessions among friends–and the motionless scenes of Angie’s unhinged state when alone, to create an atmosphere of suburban suffocation matched only by Todd Haynes’s Safe. Everything Put Together was shot entirely on digital video, and its innovative direction and excellent cast subvert the familiarity of the home video to chilling effect. –Fionn Meade

Comments

Anonymous says:

Everything Put Together is watchable independent film

Anonymous says:

I really enjoyed this movie, once I got used to the artful cinematography. The direction and filming are beautiful and I can’t say enough good about the actors. They improvised many of their scenes and had to shoot the whole film in about 15 days, often “borrowing” a location and running away because of low funds…what a great movie to have come out of such a crazy situation. The actors manage to convey the emotionalism and the psychology of their characters without going over the…

Anonymous says:

[…]Angie (Radha Mitchell) is pregnant and is having course with her friends, Barbie (Megan Mullally) and Judith (Catherine Lloyd Burns), who are also pregnant. Her husband is in love with her, and they both are preparing carefully the baby’s room. Her mother is a busy woman living in another town and does not pay much attention to her. On the delivery, Angie has a beautiful and perfect son, Gabriel, who dies less than twenty-four hours after of `sudden death’, without any apparent…

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