Da Vinci’s Inquest – Season 2

February 6, 2017 - Comment

The acclaimed crime drama that blends high-tech forensic science with old-fashioned legwork ‘I’m not a doctor. I don’t pretend to be. My job is to prevent death.’ That’s how Dominic Da Vinci sums up his job as the controversial coroner for the city of Vancouver. He relies on the expert findings of criminologists, pathologists, and

The acclaimed crime drama that blends high-tech forensic science with old-fashioned legwork

‘I’m not a doctor. I don’t pretend to be. My job is to prevent death.’

That’s how Dominic Da Vinci sums up his job as the controversial coroner for the city of Vancouver. He relies on the expert findings of criminologists, pathologists, and police – and his own hard-nosed inquiries – to ferret out the truth behind suspicious deaths. Along the way, he makes plenty of enemies.

Combining the intricate realism of Law & Order with the high-tech forensics of CSI, Da Vinci’s Inquest has a social and moral resonance that makes it truly unique. In this complete second season, you ll see why Da Vinci’s Inquest has earned international acclaim and devoted fans.

DVD SPECIAL FEATURES INCLUDE interview with series creator Chris Haddock, photo gallery, Chris Haddock bio, and cast filmographies.Nobody does world-weary cop quite as intensely as does Nicholas Campbell, who plays Dominic Da Vinci (though the late Jerry Orbach comes close). In Season 2 of Da Vinci’s Inquest, the hit Canadian police procedural, Campbell is in fine form as Da Vinci, a former Vancouver cop turned coroner. What’s great about Da Vinci’s Inquest is that it never feels formulaic, even though it delivers as a good cop procedural should.

Case in point: The episode called “Blues in A Minor.” The story revolves around the body found in its first scene–that of a young boy found washed up on the rocks underneath the Second Narrows Bridge in Vancouver. Instantly this feels different from an American cop show. The boy’s body is splayed horribly–realistically–on the rocks as the tide laps around it. There’s no unnecessary gore, but the realism grabs the viewer viscerally. There’s also another case unfolding at the same time, just like in real life–having nothing to do with the original case, but calling for attention just the same. Our hero, Campbell’s Da Vinci, is scattered between the two cases, though it’s the first that eats at him, as he follows well-meaning but mistaken leads and finally homes in on the horrible truth that led to the boy’s death.

Da Vinci’s Inquest feels as untidy as real life, and at the same time manages to be a valentine to the lovely, but quietly violent, city in which it’s set. This Vancouver is gorgeous, but not romantic; the hard-scrabble folks who settled here at the edge of the continent breed their own type of malaise. And thankfully, Da Vinci is there to battle it. Extras in the boxed set include an interview with series creator Chris Haddock, a bio of Haddock, a photo gallery, and cast filmographies. –A.T. Hurley

Comments

M. Wilson says:

Fantastic Police Procedural I had followed this show on TV when it first aired. Years later it still ranks as one of the most solid and artistic shows ever for television. The writing and cast are both of high quality and the camera work knit together with the direction inovative and superb. The show is still more inovative the almost any modern movie, just view the interesting looking non-white faces in the crowd scenes. It is now has a honored place in my film library. The Jesse Stone TV movies are in the same…

Anonymous says:

This is one of the best tv police procedurals I’ve seen and is in the league of Homicide Life on the Streets.The show is set in Vancouver, BC, and we see a side of this tourist city, one would never expect. DaVinci is a coroner who is passionate, liberal and forceful and although he appears to be outside the good ole boy network, he uses it when needed.The show is old and started in the late 90s and went on for eight seasons, but for some reason only seasons 1-3 are…

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